Jonathan Ollerhead
Creative

Jonathan Ollerhead
Creative


Pride Parade
Pride Parade

How Rainbow Washing Is Diluting The Meaning Of Pride


It's the 50th anniversary of pride this month, marking the Stonewall riots on June 28 and 29 of 1969. Cops raided the Stonewall Inn, a safe place for LGBTQ+ members of the community to gather. A protest broke out and LGBTQ+ people took to the streets to stand up for their rights. It's the reason we celebrate pride in June and the reason we have the rights we have today. As we celebrate the progress of the LGBTQ+ community it's important to note that trans and specifically black trans are still marginalized and face discrimination more than the rest of the LGBTQ+ community.

As a graphic designer and marketing professional who also happens to be a gay man, I can't help but notice how corporations use pride as a marketing event and jump on the rainbow cash cow. They sell everything from rainbow clothing to mouth wash. When corporations use the rainbow to sell products without giving back to the LGBTQ+ community, its rainbow washing. The meaning of pride is getting lost in the celebration while trans are still left behind. It is important that we keep an element of protest at pride for all the LGBTQ+ rights.

I am happy pride is a growing awareness, but LGBTQ+ people experience discrimination all year, from their families disowning them to trouble securing employment. Discrimination increases the rate of LGBTQ+ homelessness, drug addiction, and suicide rates.

As a consumer, if you want to support the LBGTQ+ community, research corporations to see if they support the LGBTQ+ community. When you buy something rainbow, find out who is profiting from it. The best way to help is to make a donation to a charity that is directly working with the LGBTQ+ community. We don't need more rainbows we need more diversity and voices in the workplace and in positions where change takes place.


Pride Parade